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Forest Service Cabins Available to Fishermen

forest service cabin in Alaska

Picture of the Alsek River Cabin from Forest Service Website at http://www.fs.fed.us/r10/tongass/cabins/yakutat/alsek_river.shtml

I have written a lot about the fishing lodges and fishing guide services in Alaska but there is a whole other side of this coin that hasn’t much been covered here at FishingTripToAlaska.

There are many, many people who come here and just fish on their own. They come to catch salmon, steelhead, trout, dolly varden, grayling, or any number of other species in the rivers, lakes, and streams in Alaska. Yes, many of them fish the ocean also, completely on their own. Not many people hear about these stalwart folks who just come, fish, and do their own thing.

If this sounds more like your kind of fishing or maybe your kind of budget, I have a great tip for you in today’s post.

The US Forest Service in Alaska has some cabins located within the boundaries of the two National Forests and scattered throughout the State of Alaska. These cabins are located in some of Alaska’s best fishing and hunting locations and are available for rent for up to a week at a time. These cabins will accommodate from 2 to 6 people and rent for $25 to $45 per night.

Some of these cabins are along the ocean while others are located inland on some of Alaska’s rivers and lakes. Most are accessible only by floatplane or by boat. There are approximately 40 of these cabins in the Chugach National Forest which encompasses the Eastern Kenai Peninsula, Prince William Sound and the Copper River areas around the town of Seward. There are another approximately 175 cabins within the Tongass National Forest which covers most of the Inside Passage from Ketchican to Yakutat.

These cabins are maintained and kept in good condition by the Forest Service however, don’t expect a luxury hotel. Most of the cabins have a stove (either wood or oil burning), a wooden table with benches, wooden sleeping platforms, good solid log walls and a waterproof roof.

You of course have to bring your own food, fuel, sleeping and cooking gear and equipment. There is no electricity, plumbing, telephone or drinking water. Even cell phone service may or not be available. Not luxurious but much better than a tent. Some of the cabins do have a rowboat with oars thrown in with the deal.

During the summer, stays are limited to 7 days or ten days during the rest of the months. Reservations are taken up to 180 days before the desired stay. These cabins are popular and fill up fast during the fishing and hunting seasons so reserve early.

The following links will give you much more information on locations, facilities, rules, and availability of the cabins.

 

Tongass National Forest

Cabin General Information   (+/- 175 cabins) 

Cabin Listing by Name     (specific locations and details)

Cabin Listing by Map     (general location of cabins)

 

Chugach National Forest

Cabin Listing  (+/- 40 cabins)

Cabin General Area Map

 

All reservations are made through http://www.recreation.gov/ . Choose Alaska as the WHERE then CAMPING & LODGING then CABINS as the final choice box.

More information can also be obtained from the Juneau Forest Service Office (phone 907-586-8751)

 

I hope that you will find the information useful in planning your own Alaskan Fishing Adventure. 

 

UPDATE  7-24-12 I recently came across this link that is a very concise summary of what to expect at these cabins. Very good information.

 

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by AlaskaJim - June 28, 2012 at 6:10 am

Categories: Alaskan Tourism, Bottom Fishing, Fishing, Halibut, Salmon   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cruising Alaska

Cruise ship in Alaska - Tracy Arm Fjord

Click Picture for full-size

Today’s Alaskan fishing blog post is going to go in a little different direction. Let’s face it, fishing in Alaska isn’t for everyone. Maybe you or someone close to you would never take the plunge to go fishing. My wife is one of those. Bring the halibut home and she will be first in the serving line for the deep-fried halibut but ask her to go fish Alaska with me…. not a chance.

I would love to get my wife to Alaska. I know that she would love the scenery, the people, and the beauty and grandeur of it all.  I am a realist enough to know that she will never commit to accompany me unless I use subversion. The only way that I will ever get her there is to trick her into it. This is where the cruise lines come in.

You see, cruises are a totally different way to see and experience the Alaskan attractions. It brings all of the comforts of home along. In fact, it brings along more than just the comforts of home. It offers anyone the opportunity to view, touch, and EXPERIENCE Alaska without getting dirty, cold, uncomfortable, or even getting up out of their seat.

Many different cruise lines serve the Alaskan waters. Alaskan cruises can begin in far off places like Vancouver, British Columbia or Seattle, WA or they can begin in any of several different Alaskan ports. Cruises come in varying lengths from 3 days to 3 weeks. A cruise can cover all of Alaska or just a few small parts of it.

Trust me, the cruise lines know how to cater to the Alaskan newbie. They know all of the best and most popular places and will get you there in a hands-on type of way. Some of them will pull right up alongside of a glacier, guests lining the rails, and motor along close enough that the guests can almost reach out and touch the glacial ice without ever leaving the boat. They will spend a day covering a particularly scenic area at low speed for your viewing enjoyment and then at night while you sleep, they can make a high-speed dash for the next area. When you awake, you are ready for the next treat.

Most cruises offer side trips during the days. This is where I will get in my fishing fix while my wife sits poolside or checks out the ship’s massage parlor. In addition, one can go and see the glaciers from the air or even land on one and go for a hike. Other side trips options  could also include dog sledding, gold mining, hiking, wildlife viewing, whale watching, and any number of other things found in Alaska. Some cruise lines even offer extended overnight trips by train to inland places like Denali National Park.

And for dining, I have eaten well at the fishing lodges but it will never compare to the endless buffets and fine dining found on a cruise ship. Something about flying the food in to the fish camp just about guarantees that it will never quite compete. Cruise ships are legendary in their reputation for great food.

Cruise ships typically cruise Alaska from May through Mid-September. The most popular months are June, July, and August when the temps are the warmest. If you are looking for a cheaper cruise, try May or September as they are a little bit harder months to book and thus the cruise lines often offer a little bit better deals.

Current cruise prices can be as low as the $600 range for the cheaper rooms and off-peak times and can go as high as the $3000 range for the fancy suites in the peak of the season. Cruises can be a very interesting way to experience Alaska and for some people, it may be the only way that they will ever experience Alaska.

Click on the banner below to see current prices on the Alaskan cruise of your dreams. I, for one, will be trying them out real soon.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by AlaskaJim - May 28, 2012 at 12:10 am

Categories: Alaskan Tourism, Bottom Fishing, Fishing, Halibut, Salmon   Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

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